Half-Baked Hall Profile: Ed Delahanty

September 7, 2014

Edward-Delahanty

Ed Delahanty 1867-1903

LF, 1B, 2B
Philadelphia Quakers/Phillies 1888-1889; 1891-1901
Cleveland Infants 1890
Washington Nationals 1901-1903

Nicknames: Big Ed, The King of Swat

Quote:

“…the hardest man in the league for pitchers to puzzle.” – Cincinnati Reds pitcher Red Ehret

Career WAR: 69.5

Best Season: 1896 .397/.472/.631/1.103 190 OPS+ 44 2B 13 HR 126 RBI 62 BB 22 K

Known For: Primarily the way he died.

Hoping to get back into the National League and hoping to see his estranged wife, he took a train bound for New York. It was a long train ride from Detroit to NYC, and Big Ed decided to down five shots of whiskey. The liquor made him uncontrollable. He pulled a woman by her ankles out of her berth, then began threatening passengers with a razor. Finally, the conductor decided to stop the train near Niagara Falls before crossing into the US. He told Delahanty to not make trouble because he was still in Canada. The drunken Delahanty slurred, “I don’t care whether I’m in Canada or dead.” It was a prescient reply. The conductor kicked him off the train, and a few minutes later Delahanty, trying to cross the train bridge into the United States, fell to his death below. There are some people who believe he was murdered and some who think he committed suicide. But most people think that one of the greatest ballplayers of all time simply made a bad drunken decision, and his body was found a week later at the base of Niagara Falls.

He Played Some Ball Too: Batted better than .400 three times, led the league in slugging percentage four times. He was also known as a “fleet-footed, rifle-armed” left fielder.

Double Agent: Served as an agent for the new American League in 1901 by helping to  facilitate the defection of at least nine Philadelphia Phillies to the new league. As a result he (and the other jumpers) were banned from playing organized baseball in the state of Pennsylvania.

A HBT Meme A Century Before The Internet: Delahanty was not a stand out, or even a very good, player prior to 1892. It was reported that he came to the team “in the best shape of his life” that year. It must have been true, because the 24-year-old posted an OPS+ of 150 or above 10 of the next 11 seasons.

Immortalized By The Baseball Project:

Sometimes, hungover, he might lose a pop fly in the glare of the Washington sun.
And yes, he swung at bad pitches, and let the Irish in him sharpen up and boozy-bloat his tongue.
Nights on the road he led a bachelor’s life, with the bright short blaze of a shooting star.
But he soaked some homers-yeah, four in one game–when the ball was dead and the fences far.

WGOM Voter Comments:

“Delahanty is the first player on the ballot who played for franchise that is currently the Minnesota Twins. Not that we’re homers here”. – Scot

“He had four brothers, every single one of them playing in the majors, though only Jim was any good.” – Beau

SABR Bio

Actual HOF Page

WGOM Election Results Page

 

 


1905: Washington Nationals

March 30, 2012

March 29, 1905

Prior to the introduction of the American League onto the sporting public in 1901, there was a National League franchise in Washington that from 1891-1899 went by the nickname “Senators.” Before settling on Senators, the team went by “Statesmen” and “Nationals” in previous incarnations, but neither of those names stuck longer than a few years. By the time the National League Washington Senators disappeared in 1899, the name “Washington Senators” was established as the name for the baseball team in the D.C. area.

When the Washington American League club was established, they were essentially without an official nickname. Newspapers didn’t really go for the name “Washington American League club” so, out of habit perhaps, they were stuck with the label “Senators.”

In 1905, the team’s owner Thomas C. Noyes made an effort to distance his team from the National League version of the Senators by allowing a committee of writers to vote for a new nickname. On March 29, 1905, just prior to the start of the team’s fifth season, the writers voted to call the team “Washington Nationals.”

For 50 years, the club’s official nickname was “Nationals.” They were rarely called that, however, in large part because the very writers who voted for the new nickname had such trouble applying it the actual team. Through the years the references to the Senators in the newspapers outnumbered the references to the official nickname. Finally, in 1955, Calvin Griffith made the name official, changing the team from the “Nationals” to the “Senators.”

For more on the history and a little of my personal venting, here is my original post on the matter.


1905: Washington’s American League Club Chooses a Nickname

March 29, 2010

March 29, 1905

Prior to the introduction of the American League onto the sporting public in 1901, there was a National League franchise in Washington that from 1891-1899 went by the nickname “Senators.” Before settling on Senators, the team went by “Statesmen” and “Nationals” in previous incarnations, but neither of those names stuck longer than a few years. By the time the National League Washington Senators disappeared in 1899, the name “Washington Senators” was established as the name for the baseball team in the D.C. area.

When the Washington American League club was established, they were essentially without an official nickname. Newspapers didn’t really go for the name “Washington American League club” so, out of habit perhaps, they were stuck with the label “Senators.”

In 1905, the team’s owner Thomas C. Noyes made an effort to distance his team from the National League version of the Senators by allowing a committee of writers to vote for a new nickname. On March 29, 1905, just prior to the start of the team’s fifth season, the writers voted to call the team “Washington Nationals.”

For 50 years, the club’s official nickname was “Nationals.” They were rarely called that, however, in large part because the very writers who voted for the new nickname had such trouble applying it the actual team. Through the years the references to the Senators in the newspapers outnumbered the references to the official nickname. Finally, in 1955, Calvin Griffith made the name official, changing the team from the “Nationals” to the “Senators.”

For more on the history and a little of my personal venting, here is my original post on the matter.


1908: Big Train pitches an important shutout

September 7, 2009

Monday September 7, 1908

File this under things that would not happen in baseball ever again.

On Friday September 4, Walter Johnson shutout the New York Highlanders, a 3-0 win for the Nats at Hilltop Park in the first of a four-game series. The next day he took the mound again. With one pitcher out due to illness, and another home with an ill wife, the Nats were carrying just three pitchers, so Johnson took the call two days in a row. On Saturday September 5 he shutout the Highlanders again, this time by a 6-0 margin.

After a team day off, Johnson got the call again in the first of a Labor Day doubleheader. The unattributed story in the New York Times is priceless:

We are grievously disappointed in this man Johnson of Washington. He and his team had four games to play with the champion (sic) Yankees. Johnson pitched the first game and shut us out. Johnson pitched the second game and shut us out. Johnson pitched the third game , and shut us out. Did Johnson pitch the fourth game and shut us out? He did not. Oh, you quitter!

Most pitchers would have gone on and taken a chance after this demonstration of comparative strength. Bit did Johnson? No sir. He weakened.  He passed up the fourth game, refusing to sit in as slabsman, and another Washingtonian named Youse, according to Umpire Evans, and spelled Hughes, according to the card, pitched the final of yesterday’s doubleheader and beat the local wonders even worse than is customary. Oh, rare Pitcher Johnson! Why did you not preserve your record in tact? Oh, thou of little faith!

Johnson also did damage at the plate, scoring two runs in a 1-for-2 effort. He was hit by a pitch in the third inning, prompting the unnamed NYT writer to comment: “Chesbro’s a good-natured person ordinarily, but something’s got to be done to keep this Johnson from continuous performance.”


The Big Swede

July 8, 2009

“Well, I don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings. I know a lot of Swedes who are nice people.”

Walter Johnson when asked why he didn’t correct those who called him “The Big Swede”

Mark Hornbaker posted this video clip from The Game Comes Home about a month ago at National’s Pride. Since WordPress doesn’t tend to be friendly with non-YouTube videos I just linked his post above. Scroll down for the clip.

Based on the clips I have seen, this will be a DVD I will be adding to my collection.


1902: Chicago Lays Down For Nats

June 2, 2009

June 2, 1902

From baseballlibrary.com:

In a 12-0 win‚ the Senators unload 3 homers in the 3rd inning against the White Sox P Clark Griffith as Ed Delahanty‚ Bill Coughlin George Carey belt the Old Fox‚ though not consecutively. After Wyatt Lee doubles‚ Griffith takes himself out. According to the Chicago Daily Tribune‚ a Washington fan had offered each member of the Nationals an expensive panama hat for their first shutout and a $50 bonus to whichever pitcher performed the feat. With little chance to win in the 9th‚ Chicago “allowed themselves to be put out without effort” so that the Washington players could win their prize (as noted by Greg Beston).

Clark Griffith might just make a name for himself in Washington for other reasons.


George McBride

February 26, 2007

George Florian “Pinch” McBride
November 20, 1880-July 3, 1973
Bats R, Throws R
5’11” 170 lbs
Playing Years: 1901-1920
.218/.281/.264 7 HR 1.5 BFW 127 WS 484 FRAR 45.9 WARP3
With Washington: 1908-1920
.221/.286/.268 5 HR 6.2 BFW 120 WS 449 FRAR 45.6 WARP3
Manager: 1921
Washington Nationals 80-73

mcbride.jpg

George McBride was born in Milwaukee, WI on November 20, 1880. The son of Irish immigrants, McBride headed west to Sioux Falls, South Dakota to begin his baseball career in 1901. After a short season with the Sioux Falls Canaries, McBride made his way back to his native Milwaukee, where he heard that the fledgling American League Brewers were missing a shortstop due to an injury.

As the story goes, McBride showed up to the ballpark on September 12 and was invited by manager Hugh Duffy to suit up for the afternoon game. McBride ended up playing three games in Milwaukee before the end of the season.

In 1902, the Milwaukee Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. McBride decided to stay in Milwaukee, and became one of the few players to jump a major league contract for a minor league deal, spending that year in between Milwaukee and Kansas City, two members of the American Association.

McBride jumped around the minors for a few more years, and started to develop the defensive reputation that he would carry throughout his major league career.

McBride was signed by Pittsburgh in 1904, and reported for the 1905 season where he was used as a utility player and a backup for Honus Wagner. McBride was traded mid-season to the St. Louis Cardinals where he finally settled in to the every day short stop position.

McBride was already showing some promise in the field in St. Louis, compiling 17 FRAR in each of his two major league seasons, a span of 198 games. It wasn’t enough, however, to make up for his awful hitting. After putting up a .169/.215/.208 line by July of 1906, he was sold back to Kansas City (AA), where he spent the rest of 1906 and all of 1907.

McBride’s break came after working on his hitting in Kansas City. The Washington Nationals purchased him in 1908, and he would spend the rest of his career in the nation’s capital.

McBride was generally known as one of the best, if not the best, fielding shortstops of his era. Today’s sabermetrics seem to confirm that, racking up at least 40 FRAR every season he was a regular in Washington (1908-1916), the peak of which was in 1914 (55 FRAR).

While his defense made him famous, McBride’s performance at the plate was just barely enough to tread water. His best offensive season came in 1910, where he compiled 95 OPS+. In a time where batting average meant everything for a hitter, McBride struggled, hitting only .218 in his career (a slightly better .221 with Washington).

Somehow, McBride earned the reputation of a clutch hitter, and earned the nickname “Pinch” for his percieved ability to come through at the plate in big situations. It is likely that this perception, whether true or not, was a major factor in McBride’s ability to stay in the lineup despite his poor hitting record. In fact, McBride was an “iron man” of his era, playing in at least 150 games for seven straight seasons. In 1908, 1909, and 1911, he was the only man to take the field at shortstop for the Nationals.

McBride’s playing time took a nose dive in 1917, when, at the age of 36, he lost the regular shortstop job in favor of Howard Shanks. He played 50 games that year, followed by three more seasons with 18 or fewer games. Clark Griffith kept him around, however, grooming his eventual successor as manager. Griffith turned the managing reigns over the McBride for the 1921 season.

McBride’s managing career was cut short due to an unfortunate accident. In late July of 1921, he was struck in the temple by a thrown ball during a practice. He was out for a week, but the dizziness and fainting lasted through the rest of the season and the offseason, forcing McBride to resign as manager and retire from baseball.

McBride did manage to do some coaching a few years later, most notably as Ty Cobb’s right hand man with the Tigers in 1925 and 1926. He retired from baseball again, this time for good, at the age of 48. McBride returned to his hometown of Milwaukee where he lived on investments he made during his playing days until the age of 92.

References:

baseballlibrary.com

baseball-reference.com

Deadball Stars of the American League. David Jones, editor.

wikipedia.org

George McBride’s baseball prospectus card


The All-Franchise Team 1901-1910

February 14, 2007

street.jpgC Gabby Street 1908-1910
357 G 100 FRAR 10.6 WARP3
.207/.267/.256 1.8 BFW 21 WS

stahl.jpg1B Jake Stahl 1904-1906
420 G 19 FRAR 9.8 WARP3
.245/.289/.343 0.1 BFW 47 WS

jdelahanty.jpg2B Jim Delahanty 1907-1909
281 G 24 FRAR 12.1 WARP3
.278/.346/.365 3.9 BFW 40 WS

mcbride.jpgSS George McBride 1908-1910
465 G 136 FRAR 19.2 WARP3
.232/.291/.276 8.7 BFW 44 WS

coughlinbill_photo1.jpg3B Bill Coughlin 1901-1904
450 G 73 FRAR 14.0 WARP3
.274/.310/.370 1.6 BFW 49 WS

delahanty_ed_1.jpg LF Ed Delahanty 1902-1903
165 G 16 FRAR 12.4 WARP3
.366/.437/.552 5.9 BFW 37 WS

milan.jpg CF Clyde Milan 1907-1910
450 G 77 FRAR 12.8 WARP3
.247/.316/.308 1.8 BFW 46

anderson.jpg RF John Anderson 1905-1907
335 G 13 FRAR 10.2 WARP3
.281/.323/.356 1.9 BFW 48 WS

johnson.jpg P Walter Johnson 1907-1910
135 G 1033 IP 25.5 WARP3
57-65 1.73 ERA/2.54 FIP/1.04 WHIP 8.2 PW 72 WS

patten2.jpgP Case Patten 1901-1908
269 G 2059.3 IP 12.9 WARP3
105-127 3.34 ERA/3.53 FIP/1.35 WHIP -0.4 PW 79 WS

hughestom_photo.jpg P Tom Hughes 1904-1909
184 G 1016.3 IP 13.8 WARP3
55-86 3.39 ERA/3.21 FIP/1.52 WHIP -3.2 BFW 58 WS


The Franchise 1910

February 12, 2007

1910 Washington Nationals
1907-1911thumb.gif
Manager: Jimmy McAleer 10th Season (1st with Washington 66-85-6)
66 W 85 L 6 T 501 RS 551 RA 7th AL 36.5 GB (Philadelphia 102-48-5)
3.19 RPG (AL = 3.64) 2.46 ERA (AL = 2.52)
.691 DER (6th AL)

al_1910_washington.gif
1910 Washington Nationals uniforms from baseballhalloffame.org

Franchise (1901-1910) 546-918-36

Cantillon Fired
After three seasons, two last place finishes, 297 losses, and only 158 wins; Joe Cantillon was fired. His replacement was Jimmy McAleer. McAleer was, prior to 1910, the only manager the St. Louis Browns had. After a second place finish is his first season, 1902, the team had just two more winning seasons (1906, 1908) and McAleers final record in St. Louis was 551-632.

mcaleer.jpg
Jimmy McAleer’s 1909 Ramley Tobacco Card

A Tradition Begins
On April 14, President Taft and his wife surprised the team by showing up for opening day at American League Park. McAleer made an off-the-cuff suggestion that the President throw out the first pitch. Taft obliged, and became the first President to do so, throwing the first pitch to Walter Johnson who took the ball and promptly shut out the eventual AL Champion Philadelphia A’s.

prz_wt.jpg
William Howard Taft makes history

Busy Train
The biggest on-the-field story of 1910 was the emergence of Walter Johnson. For the past several years, the Washington pitching staff has been a strength (as much as any part of a last place team can be called a “strength”) consistently outperforming the team’s horrible offense, and finishing right in the middle of league pitching staffs. The fact that the 1910 ‘Nats were fourth in AL ERA (2.46) and third in AL runs allowed/game (3.50) is less a statement of the overall quality of the staff than an expression of how good Walter Johnson had become.

Johnson pitched in 29% of his team’s games, 27% of the innings, and earned 38% of the ‘Nats victories in 1910 while only allowing 15% of the team’s earned runs. What’s more, Johnson led the league in strikeouts, and accounted for almost half of Washington’s total.

It’s safe to say that, in 1910, the fact that the Nationals’ team pitching was better than league average was due to Walter Johnson. Take Johnson off the team and the staff becomes well below average.

1910 World Series
Both pennant races were essentially over in July, and two 100+ victory teams matched up in the World Series. Philadelphia, led by a pitching staff featuring Jack Coombs, Chief Bender, Eddie Plank, and Cy Morgan easily handled the Chicago Cubs 4-1 in the series.

Roster/Stats
Bold = player new to Washington in 1910

C Gabby Street .202/.273/.237 1 HR 0.6 BFW 4 WS
Street shared 1910 catching duties with Eddie Ainsmith and Heinie Beckendorf, so he only played 89 games behind the plate. A .273 OBP matched his career total.

1B Bob Unglaub .234/.270/.274 0 HR -1.2 BFW 5 WS
For his final season, Unglaub returned to his most comfortable position: first base. After leading the team in home runs in 1909, he hit zero in ’10.

2B Red Killefer .229/.318/.284 0 HR 10.5 BFW 8 WS
On August 27 Killefer, who came to the ‘Nats in last season’s Delahanty trade, laid down four sacrifice bunts in the first game of a double-header against Detroit. In his first at-bat of the second game, he does it again to become the only player in recorded major league history to bunt successfully in five straight plate appearances.

SS George McBride .230/.321/.288 1 HR 4.1 BFW 16 WS
McBride dazzled defensively once again in his third season as the anchor of the Washington infield. He also had a career-high in OBP that would stand through his entire career.

3B Kid Elberfeld .251/.322/.392 2 HR -0.3 BFW 12 WS
Elberfield was a 35 year-old veteran of 11 seasons when Washington purchased him from the New York Highlanders in the offseason. His height was reportedly between 5’5” and 5’7″, but he had the reputation of a hothead, earning him the nickname “the Tabasco Kid.”

elberfeld.jpg

LF Jack Lelivelt .265/.343/.311 0 HR 0.8 BFW 10 WS
This was the only season in which Lelivelt was an every day player.

CF Clyde Milan .279/.379/.333 0 HR 2.6 BFW 23 WS
Milan equaled or surpassed career highs in nearly every offensive category in his third season as a full time player. He finished fifth in the AL in OBP due partially to his ability to draw walks. He was second in the AL in that category with 72 bases on balls.

RF Doc Gessler .259/.361/.355 2 HR 1.4 BFW 17 WS
A late 1909 trade brought Gessler to D.C., where he put up some decent deadball numbers at the age of 29.

P Walter Johnson 25-17 1.36 ERA 0.91 WHIP 5.5 PW 36 WS
1910 may be the year that Johnson made the jump from a very good pitcher to a dominant pitcher. In 1910, he led the AL in games pitched (45), complete games (38) innings pitched (370), strikeouts (313), and strikeouts per nine innings (7.61). His adjusted ERA+ was 183, a great number to be sure, but one Johnson will surpass many times before his career is over. On July 8 against the Browns, Johnson struck out the first seven men he faced. On September 25, Johnson tosses a near-perfect game, allowing the Browns only a single.

P Bob Groom 12-17 2.76 ERA 1.25 WHIP -1.6 PW 10 WS
Groom improved on his 1909 ERA by just one tenth of a run, but managed a much more respectable won-loss record due to an improved offense giving him support (the same offense that accounted for Johnson’s 20-win season on the heels of a 20-loss season).

groom.jpg
Bob Groom

P Dolly Gray 8-19 2.63 ERA 1.23 WHIP -0.2 PW 10 WS
“Goodbye” Dolly Gray would get one more chance to show he could succeed in 1911.

P Dixie Walker 11-11 3.30 ERA 1.23 WHIP -1.4 PW 8 WS
He pitched only four games in his first season in 1909. His sons, Dixie and Harry, had considerably more distinct major league careers.

P Doc Reisling 10-10 2.54 ERA 1.20 WHIP 0.2 PW 11 WS
Reisling, true to his nickname, was a practicing dentist. He did not begin his major league career until he was 29 years old. Reisling appeared in 19 games between 1904 and 1909. In 1910 he played in 30 games before his season was interrupted by illness.


The Franchise 1909

January 29, 2007

1909 Washington Nationals
1907-1911thumb.gif
Manager: Joe Cantillon 3rd Season (3rd with Washington 158-297-10)
42 W 110 L 4 T 380 RS 656 RA 8th AL 56.0 GB (Detroit 98-54-6)
2.44 RPG (AL = 3.44) 3.04 ERA (AL = 2.47)
.685 DER (6th AL)

Franchise (1901-1909) 480-833-30

A Giant Step Backwards
Joe Cantillon, now the longest tenured manager in team history, seemed to have the Nats headed in the right direction. After a typically bad finish in 1907, the team showed improvement in 1908, putting up the best won-loss record in team history. 1909 represented a major setback in Cantillon’s plans, so much so that he was out of a job following the season.

The offense was about as bad as it gets. The 1909 Nats scored only 2.44 runs per game, a full run below the league average. As a team, Washington’s OBP was a horrible .270, and SLG wasn’t much better at .275, both bottom in the league. The opposition was able to shutout the punchless lineup 30 times over the course of the season.

1908 may have been a much improved year for the pitching staff in Washington, but 1909 saw the team rocket back to the bottom of the league in most pitching categories. They allowed 4.2 RPG, almost a full run above the league average. Team ERA broke the three run barrier (3.04), while the league ERA remained at 2.47.

It all added up to a 110 loss season, the second worst season in franchise history. Only the 1904 team lost more games (113).

al_1909_washington.gif
1909 uniforms from baseballhalloffame.org

Eighteen Innings
On July 16, 1909 the Nats and Tigers played 18 innings of scoreless baseball before the game was called due to darkness. Detroit starter Ed Summers went the distance, allowing Nationals hitters only seven hits scattered throughout the 18 innings. Two Washington pitchers split the game; Dolly Gray and Bob Groom. Detroit only managed six hits against the two pitchers. Both teams threatened to score several times in the game, but neither was able to push the run across. The Washington Post reported that there was enough light to complete another inning or two, but blamed the umpire for stopping the game due to his own fatigue.

Interestingly, heading into the game, Detroit was in first place with a record of 50-28-2, while Washington already had settled into last in the AL, with a 23-52-2 record.

Professional Losers
From June 19-September 25, rookie pitcher Bob Groom lost 19 games in a row. He finished the season with 26 losses, just one more than Walter Johnson, who lost 25 despite a better than average 2.22 ERA. Dolly Gray lost 19 times, and had the distinction of walking seven men in a row to lose a game in which he allowed only one hit.

gray.jpg
Dolly Gray once walked seven men in a row

1909 World Series
The 1909 Series was billed as a matchup of two of the games biggest stars. Ty Cobb and the Detroit Tigers played against Honus Wagner and the Pittsburgh Pirates. The series went seven games, with Pittsburgh pulling it out in the final game. Wagner outplayed Cobb as well, hitting .333/.467/.500 to Cobb’s .231/.310/.346.

Roster/Stats
Bold = player new to Washington in 1909

C Gabby Street .211/.262/.246 0 HR -0.3 BFW 6 WS
His 1909 offensive numbers were about in line with his career averages. Though he had two more seasons left in Washington, he won’t come close to matching the 137 games he played in ’09.

1B Jiggs Donahue .237/.294/.286 0 HR -1.0 BFW 5 WS
Donahue was one of the three players Washington recieved from Chicago in exchange for Bill Burns in May 1909. He was one of three batters to hit better than .250 for the “hitless wonders” White Sox championship team in 1906. Not known for his offense, he was considered one of the top first basemen of his time. This would be the 19-year-old’s last season.

2B Jim Delahanty .222/.290/.308 1 HR -0.3 BFW 7 WS
Delahanty was traded to Detroit in August in exchange for Germany Schaefer and Red Killifer, who would both be regulars in 1910. The trade was a good deal for Delahanty, who led Detroit in World Series hitting with a .346/.414/.538 line. He played three more years in Detroit before finishing his career in the Federal League.

SS George McBride .234/.294/.266 0 HR 0.9 BFW 11 WS
Once again, McBride’s defense at shortstop was one of the few bright spots in an ugly season.

3B Wid Conroy .244/.298/.293 1 HR 0.1 BFW 12 WS
The veteran was purchased from the New York Highlanders in the offseason. He was the starting shortstop for Pittsburgh’s 1902 championship team (Honus Wagner played more in the outfield that year). The 32-year-old will finish his career in Washington.

conroy.gif
Wid Conroy

LF George Browne .272/.308/.344 1 HR -0.5 BFW 10 WS
Another veteran acquisition for the Nats, Browne was claimed off of waivers from the Cubs. He was best known as the lead off hitter for several of John McGraw’s Giant teams in the early part of the century. At 33 years of age, his best years were behind him. He was purchased by the White Sox in the early part of the 1910 season.

CF Clyde Milan .200/.268/.257 1 HR -1.7 BFW 3 WS
Things weren’t looking so good for Milan in 1909. The Nats stuck with him, however, and would be rewarded in a few years. Despite the poor offensive contribution, Milan was already cementing his status as a very good fielder in center.

RF Bob Unglaub .265/.301/.350 3 HR 0.3 BFW 12 WS
Unglaub also split time at first. He was the only member of the 1909 Nats with more than one home run.

OF Jack Lelivelt .292/.334/.355 0 HR 0.9 BFW 11 WS
Described as a bulky and slow-footed outfielder, the rookie Lelivelt was still one of the better offensive performers for Washington.

P Walter Johnson 13-25 2.22 ERA 1.12 WHIP 0.1 PW 12 WS
Exhibit “A” as to how bad of a team this was, and a great example of how win-loss record is a meaningless stat when it comes to evaluating a pitcher. Johnson’s 2.22 ERA, while not as outstanding as he would see in future years, was better than average in a deadball American League. Despite the astronomical loss total, Johnson was second in AL strikeouts and third in innings pitched.

P Bob Groom 7-26 2.87 ERA 1.24 WHIP -2.0 PW 7 WS
In addition to the dismal rookie season documented above, Groom also led the league in walks. He has some solid seasons ahead of him.

P Dolly Gray 5-19 3.59 ERA 1.32 WHIP -3.2 PW 3 WS
Unlike fellow rookie Groom, Gray did not have solid years ahead of him. His nickname came from “Goodbye, Dolly Gray”, a popular Spanish-American war ballad.

P Charlie Smith 6-12 3.11 ERA 1.18 WHIP -1.4 PW 3 WS
Smith was traded to the Red Sox in September and actually had a winning season in 1910. He finished his career with the Cubs.

P Tom Hughes 4-7 2.69 ERA 1.21 WHIP -0.7 PW 4 WS
Hughes would return in 1911 after a stint in the American Association with Minneapolis. His record with the Millers in 1910 was 31-12.