The Franchise 2002 (Pitchers)

SP Rick Reed 2.8 WAR
Almost a decade after the fact, Rick Reed told Anthony McCarron from the New York Daily News that  the day he was traded to the Twins the day baseball died for him.

“I wish I could’ve ended my career in New York,” Reed says. “When I was traded, I was tore up. I can say it now that I’m not playing. That’s how much we loved New York. Did I compete when I went to Minnesota? Absolutely. But there’s no place like New York.”

The numbers in 2002 certainly indicate this was not Tom Herr all over again. At the age of 37, Reed was the team’s healthiest, and therefore most consistent, starting pitcher.

SP Eric Milton 1.2 WAR
Eric Milton was not having a great season, though he seemed to be heading in the right direction when he heard his knee pop during warm ups for an early August game. It turned out he needed surgery. A month later, in the first start back, Ron Gardenhire pulled Milton with no outs in the fourth inning, starting an exchange with the manager that may have hastened the pitcher’s exit from Minnesota.

After being removed, Milton was visibly upset and was seen throwing his glove in the dugout. He had just been activated from the disabled list, but challenged Gardenhire’s rationale.

“I think that’s a bogus statement,” was among Milton’s comments on Monday. “If he thinks or the pitching coach thinks I can’t field a bunt without getting hurt, I shouldn’t be out there in the first place.”

Gardenhire said Milton never spoke to him personally about the situation.

“I haven’t talked to Milton at all,” Gardenhire said. “He didn’t point his emotions toward me. If he had done that, he would have come into this room. When he’s going out there and talking to you guys (the media), he’s not coming in here and talking to me.

“If somebody has something to say, they should come say it to me, really, if they have a problem or something they don’t like. That was a wrong way to go about his business as far as I’m concerned.”

Milton struggled in his next few starts, but pitched very well in his two playoff starts. The knee continued to be a problem, however, and Milton required another surgery in March of 2003. Though the expected return was two months, he ended up only making three starts late in the 2003 season. He was traded to the Phillies in the next offseason for Carlos Silva, Nick Punto, and Bobby Korecky.

SP Kyle Lohse 2.3 WAR
Lohse came into his own as a regular in the Twins rotation in 2002. It was a bit of a quiet emergence with Radke, Reed, Milton, Mays and later Santana also in the rotation.

SP Brad Radke 0.6 WAR
With all of the talk of contraction during the offseason, it would have been understandable if Brad Radke had exercised the escape clause in his contract to become a free agent. He stuck it out through the uncertainty, however, and stayed with the Twins. Radke’s workload was dramatically reduced in 2002 due to a few stints on the disabled list with a strained groin, though he credited the extra rest with keeping him stronger for the playoff run, in which the Radke made three very strong starts.

SP Joe Mays 0.1 WAR
After pitching ineffectively in his first three starts, Mays lost the rest of the first half of the season to an elbow injury. When he returned in late July he showed some flashes of his 2001 performance and some indication of regression. The highlights of the season were a shutout against Pedro Martinez and the Red Sox in August, and his mastery of the Angels in Game 1 of the ALCS.

SP Johan Santana 2.6 WAR
When Johan Santana joined the major league team on May 31 it was to fill in for the starting rotation through all of the injuries. He pitched extremely well while rarely being allowed to go deep into games. When the starting rotation became mostly healthy in September, Santana worked out of the bullpen.

CL Eddie Guardado 2.0 WAR
In addition to installing Jones as the everyday lead of hitter, Gardenhire also handed the job of closer to veteran Eddie Guardado. “Every Day Eddie” responded by having a career year, including a league leading 45 saves. What is interesting about Guardado, however, is that even with his gaudy numbers he was only the third most valuable reliever on the 2002 team. It says more about the role of closer than the talent of the players involved.

RP LaTroy Hawkins 2.3 WAR
Hawkins bounced back from a terrible season and a failed attempt at closing games to become one of the most dominant right-handed set up men in the league. One of the biggest changes was his walk rate: he went from walking 6.8 men per 9 IP in 2001 to walking just 1.7 men per 9 IP. His strikeout rate improved as well, and opponents batted just .217/.253/.307/.560 off of him. It was a dramatic turnaround for a guy who entered spring training with some uncertainty as to whether he would even make the team.

RP JC Romero 3.5 WAR
Romero was largely an ineffective starting pitcher in his first two seasons with the Twins, but his performance as a LOOGY in 2002 was dominant. While he was prone to walking batters (4.0 per 9 IP), when opponents did get hits off of him in 2002 it was usually just singles – he allowed a .289 slugging percentage. All-in-all, Romero was worth more WAR than any other Twins pitcher in 2002 even though he pitched in a very specialized role. Taken in combination with Hawkins, the Twins had the best 1-2 bullpen punch in baseball.

RP Tony Fiore 1.9 WAR
The Twins acquired Tony Fiore in mid-season 2001 when the Devil Rays released him. He pitched four games in 2001, but did not pitch full time until 2002. Fiore was the team’s long reliever (and occasional spot starter) who was famous for the palm ball, and for winning games. In 2002 he pitched very well, but relied on pitching in the right place at the right time to earn a 10-3 rccord out of the bullpen.

RP Michael Jackson 1.2 WAR
Jackson had been the closer for the Cleveland Indians in the late 90’s, but he was 37 years old when he signed as a free agent with the Twins for the 2002 season. It turned out he had one more good season in him, and was a welcome addition to a very good Twins bullpen in 2002.

 

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